Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner.  Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner. 

Hidden in the forests of Mount Fuji is Top Gun Beetle Co where they raise giant fighting beetles to fuel the popular Japanese sport. There are beetles from every corner of the Earth and grow to incredible sizes. Beetle fighting has many parallels with sumo wrestling which I believe has fueled its popularity. If a beetle is flipped over in the wild it is certain doom. So, rather than harm each other directly they have developed long horns to flip each other over. Beetle wrestling takes advantage of this instinct and allows human owners to pit their warriors against each other. No one gets hurt, apart from a few beetle egos, and everyone is a winner. 

Fighting insect taxidermy pieces Fighting insect taxidermy pieces Fighting insect taxidermy pieces Fighting insect taxidermy pieces Fighting insect taxidermy pieces Fighting insect taxidermy pieces Fighting insect taxidermy pieces
Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all. Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all.

Pictures from Moforibale Botanica in Tampa, Florida. Botanicas are stores that sell supplies used in the worship of several African based religions. In Tampa the primary use is in Ifa or Santeria, the worship of saints. It incorporates aspects of Catholicism and West African Vodon and originated in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The pictures of St. Lazero and Our Mother of Charity are familiar to most Catholics while shrines to Elegua, Ogun and Papa Legba are African based. The grim reaper skeleton wearing dollar bills is used in Mexican folk magic. If you are in Tampa, please give them a visit. The owner and priest is very friendly and welcoming to all.

Procession de San Lazaro

"Once banned under Castro’s Cuba, the pilgrimage was given government approval again in 1961, and the more difficult the approach to the shrine, the greater the supposed rewards. People crawl on bloodied knees to get here, or walk barefoot for kilometres through the night. Some drag themselves prostrate along the roads, both on their stomachs and backs…all in the name of exorcising evil spirits and paying off debts for miracles granted. Along the winding route, offerings of candles, flowers and coins are made to the impoverished figure of San Lázaro, who is depicted on crutches, with his sores being licked by dogs."

 

Evil eye with pierced tongue. Believed by Spanish Catholic and Santeria practitioners to ward off those who may speak ill off you.

Haskell Bay, New Zealand - A Local fisherman from New Zealand’s remote Aukland Island has reportedly caught this unidentified sea creature. The South Pacific has long been known by scientists as a hot bed for undiscovered species. As recently as 2012 New Zealand’s National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) reported several new species including the polychaete worm, uroptychus squat lobster and the black dragonfish. 

Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Tenshou-Kyousha shrineSo, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 
My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.
We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.
I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 
Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.
天照教社


〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607

+81 545-36-2630

The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 

Tenshou-Kyousha shrine

So, I traveled to Japan and had my mind set one seeing a mermaid mummy. There are a half dozen or so scattered about the country and the one by Mount Fuji seemed the most likely. Like me, you probably think that you can just sashay up to a temple and see one. Right? Wrong. 

My brother and sister-in-law were kind enough to rent a car in Fuji city where she was born. We drove an hour through the real back woods to the middle of nowhere. Eventually we ended at a rock with a Japanese symbol on it and a path nearby. After contemplating our next move we blindly followed the path and a small temple complex revealed itself through the mountain fog. A real Indiana Jones style entrance. When we got down there a little old lady popped her head out and said “I never thought youd actually find me” in Japanese. If I hadn’t been with locals I never would have. My sister in law was born and raised in Fuji and neither her nor her parents had ever heard of the temple or the mermaid.

We walked over to the temple and the little old lady let us inside. There was no electricity but she had a flash light held up to a red curtain on the opposite side of the room. And then, she pulled it aside and revealed the mermaid. It was glorious! I inspected it closely and saw that it had a mammalian head and heads and the body of a rather large fish. Unlike most mummified mermaids Ive seen it had scaled skin all the way the arms to the hands. The skull really didn’t seem like a monkey but Im not sure what else it could have been. It was a real hide because the hair and follicles were visible from up close. It was rather large, probably near 4’ if it wasn’t scrunched up. The pictures don’t do it justice because its very thick and reflective glass. I have good camera equipment with directional flashes and still just couldn’t nail a great shot in the dark. There is no door on the box and they will not remove it due to efforts to fight moisture destroying it. There is also evidence that insects got into the head at some point. Most likely moths.

I scanned the cover of a small book and paper about the temple that the woman gave me. Im told it claims that the mermaid appeared to Prince Shotoku 1,400 years ago and before dying taught him many lessons about the sanctity of life. The mermaid was once a man but was punished by the gods for futile killing of animals. The prince built a temple to house it’s body so that others can come and remember it’s teachings. The original temple was struck by a variety of accidents and it was moved several times over the years until its spirit was eventually quelled at its present location. 

Apparently I am one of the only white people to ever visit the temple. Im not surprised since there is no information online other than the fact that it has a mermaid there. Lets try and change that! Here is an address for the temple and phone number you can reach the local shinto sect to make an appointment. Good luck! You’ll need it.

天照教社

〒418-0011
静岡県富士宮市粟倉2607
+81 545-36-2630
The lady asked us to please donate 300 yen per person which is about $3. 
Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store. Kyoto’s Monster Street  
Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 
As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store.

Kyoto’s Monster Street  

Ichijo-dori in Kyoto, Japan is also know as Yokai or monster street. There is a wide range of yokai in local folklore ranging from good, to mischievous to outright evil. Some are animals, some are human and many are inanimate objects that have come alive. I asked a few locals and they told me this came from stories parents used to tell children so they would take care of their things and not be wasteful. Like, treat the broom with respect or, when you break it, it will come alive and haunt you. 

Despite what it might seem like, this is not a typical tourist street at all. These are all small local businesses catering to clientele in the neighborhood. There are not souvenir shops or anything of the sort. The lovely lady at the tea shop had a bell with a lantern yokai on it for sale but thats about it. However, it’s a fun, quirky attempt to bring some attention to the neighborhood and breathe some life into all but forgotten Japanese folklore. 

As you can see by the map, the whole thing is just a few blocks an certainly worth the 30 minutes it takes to do it. Ichijo-dori comes up on Google maps and its near several other sites in Northwest Kyoto. There are around 30 different yokai statues but I posted pictures of some of my favorites. My wife and I especially enjoy Baeneko, a two tailed cat that can control dead bodies. I threw in a pic of us with one at a shoe store.

The mayor of Tampa, Florida is destroying one of the oldest public skate facilities in the world. A landmark on the National Register of Historic Places. It's an argument that boils down to him thinking that it will disturb the aesthetic of a new park he's building. He has been relentless in his pursuit and today it looks like he's gotten the demolition voted through city council. I had many great times at the Bro Bowl and I will remember it in all it's glory. Bob, this is how I will remember you.